A very German botanical garden

When I was in Münster at the weekend with Eldest Daughter, we went to visit the university’s botanical gardens. In my defence, I should state that this was, in fact not the cruel act of a heartless parent… dragging a reluctant teenager around the most boring sightseeing available.  No, Eldest Daughter actually wanted to see the botanical gardens. Of her own free will. Really.

You see, as of October, she will be studying biosciences there and her course will involve her making the acquaintance of plant life for the first time.

Like most teenagers, Eldest Daughter’s knowledge of plants to date has been pretty much limited to a life-long mission to avoid broccoli or sprouts. So the Münster University Botanical Gardens will have its work cut out to fill in all the gaps.

The entire park is laid out like a massive pop-up botanical textbook. The plants are lovingly labelled and huge notices provide more information than you could ever wish to know.

Parts of the gardens focus on particular families of plants and particular habitats….such as the moorland section or the sand dunes. These areas are actually laid out to look like natural heathland or scrubland. There are no tidy flowerbeds, just swathes of moor, with heathers and sedges… or rolling sand dunes with tufts of scrubby grass or spiky plants clinging to the sheltered side of each hillock.

There are also swamps…

…meadows…

…and wooded streams.. to name but a few.

Then there is the medical section. This includes extensive information on the medicinal uses of plants – grouped according to the ailments which they cure… here, for instance, an exhibition of plants used to cure sex-specific diseases.

Each plant is carefully labelled, not just with its name and basic botanical data, but also a set of symbols outlining how it is used. I can see that students will never again need to visit a doctor or pharmacy… they can just pop down to the botanical gardens and find out which flowers or leaves to steep into a healing potion!

I was very excited to see that courgettes (of which I still have several billion growing in my garden) have significant uses in the cure of ailments relating to the prostate.

I shall make a note to renew my efforts at offloading them on my elderly male neighbours. Citizens of Meerbusch…I come to heal your prostates…

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4 Comments

Filed under About Germany, food, german education, Life in Germany

4 responses to “A very German botanical garden

  1. Neil

    Do you eat the corgettes for them to help, or are they to be applied otherwise ;o)

  2. funny botanical garden story…the mainz uni botanical garden is just a few blocks from where i live, so occasionally i go walk around. now, many of you may know that poison ivy and poison sumac do not grow in this part of the world. since moving they have become a faraway part of my childhood memories…and so i was quiet disgruntled to find a huge poison sumac bush in the middle of the garden, complete with signs about keeping your distance and such. wait, did i say this story was funny? who puts the most irritating plant in north america in a garden outside with a flimsy little fence just to look at?! idiots! anyway…so there’s a little comment tangent for you. long live the land of (almost) no poison ivy.

  3. I’ll have to check this out for some self-healing/self-diagnosis. Sound like an interesting place to visit.

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